Historical Fencing, Historical Treatise, History

Gala of the Knight, Blazon of the Champion by Ibn Hudayl

Gala of the Knight, Blazon of the champion Edition in Spanish by Maria Jesus Viguera, English translation by Nicholas Petrou. Gala of the Knight, Blazon of the Champion is a Furusiya (literally translated to “horsemanship”) treatise written by Abu-I-Hassan Ali ibn Abd-ar-Rahman al-Farazi al-Andalus, more famously known as Ibn Hudayl, in 1392. The Treatise can… Continue reading Gala of the Knight, Blazon of the Champion by Ibn Hudayl

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Historical Fencing

Mamluk Lance work: Implying Mamluk sword play from two lance treatises

Mamluk lance work is renowned in a large amount of treatise, the earliest being from Akhi Hizam al-Kuttali, a master lancer in the late 9th Century CE whose work was so vast, it was split into two treatises that these were copied and separated, a lot of the material being copied and formatted in later… Continue reading Mamluk Lance work: Implying Mamluk sword play from two lance treatises

Historical Fencing

“The Treasure that combines all things”: The 1470 Mamluk Treatise – Context and understanding

The surge of interest in North African and Mamluk Historical Martial Arts has grown considerably, especially with the translation of the 1470 treatise by an anonymous author. It's difficult to ascertain who exactly this person was but by understanding the historical context surrounding the construction of the treatise, we are able to get an understanding… Continue reading “The Treasure that combines all things”: The 1470 Mamluk Treatise – Context and understanding

Historical Fencing

Historical African Martial Arts: Introductions and Issues

When people talk about Martial Arts, they will typically look to Asia and point to various Martial Arts like karate, Jujitsu, Kung Fu and Taekwondo. If one were to diverge from the cliché's, they could venture further to find Martial Arts like Savate (French Kickboxing) or Sambo (Russian Wrestling) which are more in-tune to people… Continue reading Historical African Martial Arts: Introductions and Issues

Historical Fencing

A brief History of Ethiopian Swords

Ethiopia: A Kingdom which existed for 800 years whose culture has existed since the time of ancient Egypt. With the existence of the Kingdom itself came blades of different types. This article will give a brief history of those blades. Before I begin, it's important to emphasise that the main type of weapon used by… Continue reading A brief History of Ethiopian Swords

Historical Fencing

The Flyssa – The long-Knife of the Maghreb

The Flyssa is relatively unknown in origin, however there are a  few clues we have which indicate where it came from and how it was used. The word itself comes from a group of Kabyle Bebrer, a confederation which nowadays inhabits the North of Algeria. As a result, due to proximity to the coast, these… Continue reading The Flyssa – The long-Knife of the Maghreb

Historical Fencing

The History of the Nimcha

People, even those learned in weaponry, when asked what a nimcha is will shrug their shoulders and simply say "I don't know". Those who are acquainted with the weapon will give a brief overview but apart from some popularised myths, will say little else. The nimcha is an example of both innovation and integration of… Continue reading The History of the Nimcha

Historical Fencing

The HEMA hierarchy of needs: The road of improvement (not self-improvement)

Disclaimer, this is directed to HEMA but can be applied to any Martial Art, hobby or activity. HEMA is Historical European Martial Arts. I've spoken about it before so it's not worth going into detail about what it is. Put simply, it's reconstructing Martial Arts which no longer exists such as those of Medieval knights;… Continue reading The HEMA hierarchy of needs: The road of improvement (not self-improvement)

Historical Fencing

What a lot of people take ages to learn in HEMA

For people who don't know, HEMA is Historical European Martial Arts which aims to reconstruct Martial Arts which no longer exists, whether it's fighting like a knight in the 1400's or a British Officer in the Napoleonic Wars; it covers both armed (longsword, sabre, halberd, spear) and unarmed (grappling, bare-knuckle boxing) combat. For this article,… Continue reading What a lot of people take ages to learn in HEMA

Historical Fencing

The Nature of Eastern Roman Martial Arts

Within the HEMA community, at various lengths explanations have been given about the absence of treatises to do with combat, more specific forms of Martial Arts, in the Roman World. For a vast Empire and a culture which endured for nearly 2000 years, there is little information in the way of showing how warriors individually… Continue reading The Nature of Eastern Roman Martial Arts